I’ve been brewing more sessionable beers these days and this is a style that I have tasted at homebrew competitions and I really wanted to brew this style for some time. I’m glad I finally took the plunge and did it because I am very pleased of the results.

Also with this beer I used pilsner malt from Riverbend Malt House out of Asheville, NC. When I tried a few of the grains while I milled the malt, and oh my gosh, this stuff was tasty! I was super anxious to try this beer after snacking on the malts during the brew day. Just to note, I believe using a quality flavorful malt enhanced this beer from good to great.

Tasting Notes: Abbey Yeast (WLP 530)
Aroma:
Light grainy pilsner malt aromas that also include a faint hint of grass, light spice and floral hop aromas, fruity esters are moderate that are reminiscent of pears. Low levels of the phenolics (clove). Delicate aroma that the fruity esters and hops sort of mingle together with the malt background.

Flavor: Cracker-like with a touch of grass pilsner-like malt flavors. Hop flavor is low with some floral notes. Moderately-low bitterness. Fruity esters are moderate with pears dominating. Finished dry with a slight spice and pear notes throughout the finish.

Tasting Notes: Belgian Ale Yeast (WLP 550)
Aroma:
Light grainy pilsner malt aroma, moderately light spice and floral hop aromas. Moderate phenolics that include clove and black pepper. A very faint honey characteristic.

Flavor: Moderate clove and black pepper phenolics dominate the flavor. The malt background is cracker-like with a touch of grass. Hop flavors are low and floral. Finished dry with a lingering clove and spice component through the finish of the drink.

Since I’ve been doing mostly 10 gallon batches, a good percentage of my beers have been how about I pitch different yeasts to see what different characteristics I’ll get out of each beer. I didn’t think this one would be drastically different, but since I’ve been drinking these two beers side by side quite a bit, I do prefer the Abbey Ale yeast over the Belgian Ale yeast. This is not saying that I do not like the Belgian Ale yeast, I just prefer the ester profile of the Abbey Ale over the Belgian Ale in this beer. Trust me, neither of these beers are going to “water” my flowers anytime soon.

Cheers!

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 26.7 IBUs 4.6 SRM 1.046 1.006 5.3 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
Trappist Single 26 A 1.044 - 1.054 1.004 - 1.01 25 - 45 3 - 5 2.4 - 3.4 4.8 - 6 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Riverbend Pilsner 18 lbs 90
Biscuit (Dingemans) 1 lbs 5
Sugar, Table (Sucrose) 1 lbs 5

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Hallertau 3 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 3.4
Hallertau 1 oz 15 min Boil Pellet 3.4
Willamette 1 oz 5 min Boil Pellet 4.2

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 7.47 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 5.91 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Calcium Chloride 4.81 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Lactic Acid 2.50 tsp 60 min Mash Water Agent
Salt 0.74 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Abbey Ale (WLP530) White Labs 78% 66°F - 72°F
Belgian Ale (WLP550) White Labs 82% 68°F - 78°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 147.9°F 90 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

Notes

9.7g epsom salt….whoops

This past fall I taught a personal enrichment class that focused on beer and food pairings. I brewed a hefe for this class and I also brined my Thanksgiving turkey in this beer as well (which turned out phenomenal by the way). I also baked bread using this beer. Yes, this is a basic hefe recipe, well pretty much a basic hefe recipe. I thought I had more wheat malt on hand that I actually did, so I supplemented the wheat malt with some flaked wheat. I thin it added a little more body to the beer and I don’t believe it really hurt the beer. I also used Hallertau Blanc to bitter as I didn’t want to buy an ounce of Hallertau since I had this variety around.

This beer was just a solid beer and might have a presence in my kegerator on the regular. Mainly because this is one of the top 5 styles that the wife likes, it’s good to have beer on tap that she can appreciate as well.

After you see the pictures below of the turkeys and bread, I am sure you might want to know where I got the recipes. Well you’re in luck because I want to share those with you because you deserve it.

Honey Hefeweizen Boule Loaf

Beer Brined Turkey

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 13.7 IBUs 3.4 SRM 1.050 1.012 5.1 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
Weissbier 10 A 1.044 - 1.052 1.01 - 1.014 8 - 15 2 - 6 2.9 - 4.5 4.3 - 5.6 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pilsner Malt (Rahr) 11 lbs 51.16
Wheat, Flaked 8.5 lbs 39.53
Wheat Malt, White (Rahr) 2 lbs 9.3

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Hallertau Blanc 0.8 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 9.7

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Calcium Chloride 6.60 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 5.27 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 4.16 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Lactic Acid 2.00 tsp 60 min Mash Water Agent
Salt 0.75 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Weihenstephan Weizen (3068) Wyeast Labs 75% 64°F - 75°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 152.1°F 75 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

At least for me, and my brewing as of late, I’ve been brewing lagers. Yes I’ve been following the Brulosophy way of “warm-fermented” lagers. I probably will get some haters, it’s all good. But being able to pump out some delicious lagers in approximately three weeks has been what this summer has needed. It’s mid-October and I still break out in a sweat when I walk outside. This has been a ridiculously hot summer. What is better than drinking a cold and crispy Pilsner with a little bit of hop flavor in there to refresh the palate? Not too much.

Now will these lagers win awards if I submitted them into a homebrew competition. I don’t think so. Take this with a grain of salt here, These are pleasing to me, but they might not be award winners, I’m not entering that many competitions lately. Hell, I received the BJCP rank of National and I haven’t even judged a competition lately.

Onto the beers. The first recipe I used the yellow bitter water profile. I did enjoy the beer, but I felt the beer was just a touch too bitter. When I brewed the second pilsner, I went with the yellow dry profile and I believe I enjoyed this one the best. I did use a different yeast for the wedding pilsner. But apparently both of the these yeasts are the Weihenstephaner strain. They both produce a lot of sulfur during fermentation, and they both left the beer pretty dry. The bitterness profile is the difference between the two. But if you were to give them to me blindly, I know I couldn’t tell the difference.

Now you may ask, why the second recipe is called the wedding pilsner. It is because I brewed this beer to be served at two wedding showers. I could have called it the Mandarina Bavaria Pilsner, but Wedding Pilsner is easier to say.

Huell Melon Pilsner

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 32.7 IBUs 2.6 SRM 1.053 1.010 5.8 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
German Pils 5 D 1.044 - 1.05 1.008 - 1.013 22 - 40 2 - 5 2.5 - 3.2 4.4 - 5.2 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pilsen Malt 2-Row (Briess) 20 lbs 90.91
Vienna Malt (Briess) 2 lbs 9.09

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Warrior 1 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 16.7
Huell Melon 4 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 7.2

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 14.67 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Calcium Chloride 4.45 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Phosphoric Acid 10% 3.00 tsp 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 2.88 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Salt 1.54 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Global (L13) Imperial Yeast 75% 46°F - 56°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 147.9°F 90 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

Wedding Pilsner

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 41.0 IBUs 2.6 SRM 1.050 1.009 5.4 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
German Pils 5 D 1.044 - 1.05 1.008 - 1.013 22 - 40 2 - 5 2.5 - 3.2 4.4 - 5.2 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pilsen Malt 2-Row (Briess) 20 lbs 90.91
Vienna Malt (Briess) 2 lbs 9.09

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Warrior 1 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 16.7
Mandarina Bavaria 4 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 10.7

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 7.52 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 5.95 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Calcium Chloride 4.84 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Lactic Acid 2.20 tsp 60 min Mash Water Agent
Salt 0.74 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Saflager Lager (W-34/70) DCL/Fermentis 75% 48°F - 59°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 147.9°F 90 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

Now if you were like me I never knew what the term T-90 pellet hops stood for. After a quick Google, I found it is the way the hop was processed and pelletized. If you want more details about this, you came to the wrong place.

Now, I’ve wanted to pull the trigger on the cryo hops. I’ve had them in my shopping cart multiple times and just never could go ahead and take the plunge. When I saw this experiment come down the pipe, I quickly jumped on it. This way I can try both versions and see if the cryo hops are worth my while. I will say this, I only have 1 hop spider. To make things as similar as they both can be, I didn’t use the hop spider. The clean up on the T-90 hops took almost 4 times the effort because of all of the vegetal matter that was left behind. Will this alone be worth it? Well the hop spider makes this much easier for me, so this isn’t too much of a big deal.

I’m beating myself up because I didn’t take pictures of my dual chilling setup. I split the wort into two pots. I must say that I was quite proud of what I did. Luckily I have two immersion chillers, two pumps, therefore I was able to rig a way to whirlpool the extra pot so I could treat each beer the same.

I ended up doing two tasting sessions with each participant taking a triangle test. One session had 13 participants, the other had 14. I was super surprised at the results. I only had 4 total tasters out of the 27 correctly guess the correct cup. This was very interesting, during the first session I thought it was it was a no brainer. The second session which was 9 days later, I don’t think I could tell the difference.

After I told the participants what the odd cup out was, a good majority said it was down to the odd cup out and the one they actually selected. Another interesting not is that I setup a jockey box at an event (where I had the 2nd session) and a couple of them tried the beers before hand without my knowledge and asked me if those beers were different. I gave some non committal answer to them and proceeded went on my way onto something else. When I gave the triangle test, they could not distinguish the odd beer out.

I really thought the cryo hops would give the beer a brighter and more hop flavor/aroma, but I believe the beers are very similar. Not much difference. Even with me knowing the variable, I don’t think I could pick out the odd sample.

This was a very cool experiment and I am glad I participated in it. Will I buy cryo hops from now on when doing my hoppier style beers? Probably not unless I find them on sale. It’s an awesome idea and yay technology, but in my opinion, I don’t see a huge benefit to it.

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
12 gal 60 min 72.7 IBUs 7.0 SRM 1.050 1.011 5.1 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
American Pale Ale 18 B 1.045 - 1.06 1.01 - 1.015 30 - 50 5 - 10 2.3 - 3 4.5 - 6.2 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt (2 Row) US 20 lbs 86.96
Munich Malt - 10L 2 lbs 8.7
Caramel Malt - 60L (Briess) 1 lbs 4.35

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Hallertau Magnum 1.8 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 11.8
Citra 1 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 13.8
Citra - LupuLN2 1 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 25.2
Mosaic (HBC 369) 1 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 14.9
Mosaic - LupuLN2 1 oz 20 min Aroma Pellet 23.2
Cascade 1 oz 7 days Dry Hop Pellet 7.8
Cascade - LupuLN2 1 oz 7 days Dry Hop Pellet 12.8

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Calcium Chloride 17.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 17.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Phosphoric Acid 10% 1.00 tsp 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Safale American (US-05) DCL/Fermentis 77% 59°F - 75°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 152.1°F 75 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

Notes

Moved half of the wort into the Anvil Kettle. Chilled both worts to ~160 degress. Turned off wort chillers and recirculated for 20 minutes, then started chilling again. Both worts were around 120-130 when I started chilling again. Then it took approximately 30 minutes to chill to 68 degrees. Each carboy was pitched with US-05.

I just brewed this triple hopped, hazy Double IPA, y’all! I’m just taking a silly jab there. I really don’t know what to call this beer. It’s hazy, it’s hoppy, it’s got a slight warming to it. Hey it’s beer! Brewed this beer with Henry and Brian. Henry found a recipe he liked and he tweaked it to his liking (mainly because we couldn’t find Galaxy hops that weren’t stupid expensive). Am I happy with it? It’s drinkable, and has become more drinkable everyday I pull some off the tap. When I first kegged it and pulled a sample a few days after kegging and dry hopping, but before it was carbonated, I was really concerned. I did some research on dry hopping in the keg and of course the Internet is right, am I right? You know since this post is on the Internet everything I write is true </sarcasm>. Ok, I’m done there, but anyways, I found that some people would get vegetal and grassy characters from dry hopping in the keg. By the way this is what I was perceiving I was not pleased at all. I pulled the keg out for about a week to hopefully extract some of those wonderful lupulin oils into the beer. Those qualities have seemed to have faded into the distance (whew!).

A few tasting notes on the beer. I think we have the malt profile down with this recipe. I want to put something other than 6 oz of Columbus into the whirlpool though. It is super earthy and dank, not the quality I was looking for in this beer. I wanted more fruit flavors in it. If I am to re-brew this I may use the same hop profile I used in the Wit Gone Indie recipe. Or another option is that I did buy a pound of Azaaca recently. It’s pretty bitter, as BeerSmith tells me it’s 110 IBUs. Woah! It’s not offensively bitter though and there isn’t too much malt sweetness to balance it out. The aroma of the beer is fantastic though. But how would you learn if you didn’t brew something you thought you couldn’t improve upon. Lesson learned. But this is not a bad lesson.

And another reason I’m having a bad relationship with this beer is oh my, what a brew day we had! Read my notes below on the massacre of a brew day it was. Not all brew days go well, do they? This one, well I was ready to break up once we were done.

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 110.0 IBUs 6.4 SRM 1.090 1.023 9.0 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
Double IPA 22 A 1.065 - 1.085 1.008 - 1.018 60 - 120 6 - 14 2.4 - 2.9 7.5 - 10 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pilsner Malt (Rahr) 26 lbs 68.42
Oats, Flaked 4 lbs 10.53
Wheat, Flaked 4 lbs 10.53
Caramel Malt - 20L (Briess) 2 lbs 5.26
Carapils (Briess) 2 lbs 5.26

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Columbus (Tomahawk) 2 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 17.8
Columbus (Tomahawk) 2 oz 10 min Boil Pellet 17.8
Columbus (Tomahawk) 6 oz 30 min Aroma Pellet 17.8
Nelson Sauvin 8 oz 0 min Dry Hop Pellet 12
Citra 4 oz 0 min Dry Hop Pellet 14.1
Mosaic (HBC 369) 4 oz 0 min Dry Hop Pellet 12.3
Columbus (Tomahawk) 2 oz 0 min Dry Hop Pellet 14

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Calcium Chloride 17.75 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Epsom Salt (MgSO4) 11.13 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 7.81 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Baking Soda 3.33 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
London Ale III (1318) Wyeast Labs 73% 64°F - 74°F
SafAle English Ale (S-04) DCL/Fermentis 73% 59°F - 75.2°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Saccharification 152.1°F 75 min
Mash Out 168°F 10 min

Notes

What an eventful brew day. Mashed in and there was absolutely no flow coming out of the mash tun. I back flush it with water. I got some flow, and then all of the sudden the flow stops. I try to get going again, let the wort settle down, no dice. We move the mash into one of the old igloo cooler mash tuns. Well, it doesn’t fit in the 10 gallon mash tun. AND! No flow out of that mash tun either!! UGH! I take apart the keggle converted mash tun to find that there is a HUGE amount of grain in the dip tube. UGH!! I see that the false bottom is bent pretty badly. I took a hammer to that thing and attempted to flatten it out. We then move the mash back into the keggle mash tun. BOOM WE HAVE FLOW! Then it comes to a dragging halt. WTF! Ok, Well, I throw my hands up. We’re at roughly 1.065, WAY off the 1.080 we should have been. I start draining the mash tun, then I put in all of the DME I had on hand which is roughly 21 ounces. After the pump seems to have finally pooped out, we scooped out all of the grain for Troy to use to make crackers with. I notice there is STILL a bunch of wort left in the bottom. I use a paint strainer bag in a 5 gallon bucket and we dump all of the wort and left over grain into it. Boom, we got roughly 2 more gallons of wort ouf of the mash that I wouldn’t have thought I got because the pump quit flowing.

Beer finished at 18 brix with 11 gallons of total wort

Looks like I’m in this whole experimental thing for the long haul. This time the Experimental Brewing Podcast is testing Biotransformation.

Question: Does Dry Hopping a Beer During High Krausen Produce a Organoleptic Difference. Note: If you’re like me, you had the confused puppy look with Organoleptic. Let me help ya, being, affecting, or relating to qualities (as taste, color, odor, and feel) of a substance (as a food or drug) that stimulate the sense organs. That helped me, hopefully that’ll help you also.

This one was an interesting experiment. The difference in the two carboys was the dry hopping schedule. As you can see in my notes. A trip interfered with dry hopping my second carboy, which I think threw it off a touch. But all in all the beers turned out reasonably well and it was not easy to distinguish between the two beers. I am afraid I wasn’t able to have the taste panel I really wanted to have, but you know that happens. I still have plenty of beer left, maybe I can update this post if I can get some other tasters on board.

Here is the tasting panel I held. Nine total testers, three of them picked the odd sample. One of the testers was determined to get it correct so she asked for another triangle test. Well unfortunately, she could not pick the odd sample on her second go around. After the opaque cups were tested, I gave each one a sample in a clear plastic cups. It was interesting to see how the difference in preference was when the samples were given in clear glasses.

Notes on yellow cup (odd sample):

  • Slightly more hop forward
  • Very Bitter, hop flavor astringent
  • firm flavor

Notes on green cup:

  • hint of hops, very similar to purple
  • Strongest flavor of the three
  • lighter, smells off

Notes on purple cup:

  • hint of hops
  • smooth, mild flavor

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 40.6 IBUs 5.8 SRM 1.053 1.013 5.2 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
American Pale Ale 18 B 1.045 - 1.06 1.01 - 1.015 30 - 50 5 - 10 2.3 - 3 4.5 - 6.2 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt (2 Row) US 10 lbs 45.45
Pale Malt, Maris Otter 8 lbs 36.36
Munich 10L (Briess) 4 lbs 18.18

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Centennial 1.5 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 10
Centennial 2 oz 5 min Boil Pellet 10
Mosaic (HBC 369) 2 oz 5 min Boil Pellet 12.7
Centennial 2 oz 14 days Dry Hop Pellet 10
Mosaic (HBC 369) 2 oz 14 days Dry Hop Pellet 12.7

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Calcium Chloride 16.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 16.00 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
London Ale III (1318) Wyeast Labs 73% 64°F - 74°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Mash In 152°F 60 min

Notes

Will dry hop carboy A when it reaches high krausen. Record length from dry hop until terminal gravity is reached. Note number of days until terminal gravity reached. Rack to a keg and keep cold.
Dry hop carboy B when terminal gravity is reached for the same amount of days that carboy A was dry hopped.

Purchased 2 packes of Wyeast 1318, dated April 17, 2017. Each pack of yeast was put into 1000 mL of wort for a SNS starter.

Since the IBU experiment I particpated in, I have been timing my chilling.
10 minutes - 133F
20 minutes - 103F
30 minutes - 90F

Each carboy got 30 seconds of O2. Pitched yeast approximately 7 hours after brew sessions was finished.

Dry hopped Carboy A - 5/15/2017
Kegged Carboy A - 5/25/2017

Dry hopped Carboy B - 6/7/2017
Kegged Carboy B - 6/17/2017

 

 

 

My homebrew club does a a intra-club competition that we call the Makeshift Mashout. We have everyone put ingredients into 3 hats: a brewing ingredient, a hop, and a yeast. I believe I entered oats, mosaic hops, and Vermont Ale  yeast because I’m kind of on a New England IPA kick, yes, I’m brewing with the trends these days, excuse me there. The three ingredients that were selected were oats (WOOT!), CTZ hops, and saison yeast. I started on my journey of formulating a recipe. Where do I go to none other than The Mad Fermentationist Blog. I found a recipe of his using Columbus hops and oats. I used his Softer, Juicier, and Uglier APA recipe as the basis for this beer.  I didn’t have any Nelson Sauvin hops and me being me, I didn’t want to buy a pound of them. I ordered 8 ounces of El Dorado hops. The descriptors of these hops were pear, watermelon, and stone fruit. This is exactly what I’m looking for in this IPA. I had some Amarillo stashed away in the freezer and ordered some CTZ hops with the El Dorados and now I’m about ready to fire up the kettle.

My grain bill was missing malts that would drop the mash pH in the effective range, this is why the initial grain bill called for acidulated malt. If you’re wondering no, I don’t have a reliable pH meter, I’m going all on gut instinct, which, well probably isn’t the best method. A reliable pH meter is on my wish list which will happen sooner than later. The acidulated malt I had in stock was overrun with weevils. It was disconcerting the amount of bugsthat had taken over the malt. I ditched them out in the yard and went onto something else. Since it was just for lowering mash pH, I added phosphoric acid to my mash water. At least this was a quick fix. Have I mentioned I need to go ahead and buy a reliable pH meter?

Harvester of Aqua

Also to note, I harvested my water from a spring that is 20 miles south of where I live. The water is very pure tasting and it has made some fantastic beers. I would love to get my hands on the analysis report. I do have a Total Dissolved Solids meter and it read 13 PPM. Pretty pure if you were to ask me. I built up a small water profile by using a 2:1 ration sulfites to chloride. Why the small numbers in these? Well I only had 6.6 grams of gypsum, so there you go. I wanted to use 2 grams of gypsum per gallon of water used, that didn’t happen as you see. No problem though, at the end I’ll still have beer.

Now onto my fermentation, this thing was super active which made me a happy brewer. The saison yeast was a few months past the prime, but I did a yeast starter and both yeasts were happily fermenting.

NE IPA and the “saison” fermenting away nicely. #homebrew

A video posted by wickdawg (@wickdawg) on

I can’t wait to write up some tasting notes on this bad boy. When I open the chest freezer to check on my babies in there, it smells glorious. I hope that transpires into what I am about to enjoy.

This beer has had a lot of life so far. There is a local artisan bakery in town. I sent him a text the morning of my brew day and told him this was a little different grain bill than usual and he was interested in what I had. He came by a few hours later to pick up my spent grains and he made some lovely loafs of bread. If you ever want to know what a brew day smells like, this bread delivered those aromas to his customers. It smelled of sweet grains and wort to boot. It was mighty tasty bread. I believe it might have been my favorite bread to come out of his bakery.

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
11 gal 60 min 56.5 IBUs 3.9 SRM 1.061 1.012 6.4 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
American IPA 21 A 1.056 - 1.07 1.008 - 1.014 40 - 70 6 - 14 2.4 - 2.9 5.5 - 7.5 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt (2 Row) US 14 lbs 56
Oats, Flaked (Briess) 5 lbs 20
Wheat Malt, Bel 5 lbs 20
Carafoam (Weyermann) 1 lbs 4

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Columbus (Tomahawk) 2 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 17.8
El Dorado 3 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 13.9
Amarillo 1 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 7.2
Columbus (Tomahawk) 1 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 17.8

Miscs

Name Amount Time Use Type
Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) 6.60 g 60 min Mash Water Agent
Calcium Chloride 3.30 g 60 min Mash Water Agent

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Leeuwenhoek Saison Blend (WLP564) White Labs 78% 64°F - 90°F
London Ale III (1318) Wyeast Labs 73% 64°F - 74°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Mash In 152°F 60 min

Notes

Heated 8 gallons of water in the BK to mash. Doughed in with 170 degree water. Initial mash temperature was ~142 degrees. Boiled ~1 gallon of water to add to mash to raise the mash temperature. Added to the mash, the mash was inconsistent as far as temperature, but was averaging around 152 degrees. Added 1/2 tsp of phosporic acid to mash water to help lower pH. I do not have a pH meter, just blindly did this.

Heating 8.5 gallons of water in the HLT with my immersion circulating heater covered with foil to keep heat in.

Anvil FIAK
—————
Wyeast 1318 London Ale III
12 hours after pitch - 1 ounce El Dorado Hops
1 ounce El Dorado - 14 Days
1 ounce Amarillo - 14 days
.5 ounce Columbus - 14 Days
1 ounce El Dorado - 7 Days
1 ounce Amarillo - 7 Days
.5 ounce Columbus - 7 Days

6 Gallon Glass Carboy
———————————
WLP564 Leeuwenhoek Saison Blend
1 ounce El Dorado - 14 Days
1 ounce Amarillo - 14 Days
1 ounce Columbus - 14 Days

2016-09-06-07-47-07First off, I know what most of you are thinking. He really used store bought apple juice? Yes I did. Why? In Mississippi I cannot run down to my local apple orchard and get fresh juice. I have made some pretty good ciders with store bought juice. I used to use a certain kind of apple juice in my ciders, but now I cannot find it anymore which is a bummer. I went with this Wal-Mart brand because it wasn’t from concentrate. Will this make a difference in flavor? Who knows. I know when I pulled a sample before I pitched the yeast, the flavor was really good. It was wifey approved. Also I looked up how to use apple juice in Beer Smith. From the few things I read, was calculate how much sugar is in the juice and just add it in Beer Smith as table sugar. That is what I did. I also made some notes as you’ll see.

Beer Smith said this thing would attenuate down to .988, if US-05 has 77% attenuation as it is listed in there, I would imagine it would get to around 1.010-1.013. That would be my target anyways, I do want some sweetness around. This will not be an 8.6% ABV beverage.

Yield 2.5 gallons in the keg

  • 2 gallons Apple Juice
  • 2 qts Just Tart Cherry Juice
  • 1.5 lbs honey
  • 1 qt water
  • 1 tsp yeast nutrient 
  • 1 pkg Safale US-05
  • 2 tsp lactic acid (added at kegging)

Procedure: Weighed honey in an empty apple juice bottle then added apple juice to mix. Added yeast nutrient to apple juice bottle to shake up and mix. Pitched dry yeast directly onto the must. 

O.G. 1.057

I made this for an event I was pouring at and of course I did not let it finish. Added lactic acid and force carbonated. It was a tad sweet, but people like sweet beverages and it was a hit. After the event, I left the keg outside for a few days to let it ferment down a touch more and it did indeed dry out some. Probably about to where I like it. Eventually this will be a staple on tap at the house. 

2016-07-30 07.34.00Going back to my Busty Porter recipe I brewed at the first of this year and my other robust porter recipes, the Busty Porter was just stuff I had sitting around at home because it was not my normal porter recipe. Well, this time I made sure I had everything. This is also going to be one of the quickest turn-around on a beer I’ve ever done. I brewed this beer exactly 2 weeks before the event. Racked to the keg after being in the fermenter for 11 days, thew it in the kegerator, and used the Blichman QuickCarb the next day to carb this puppy up. I pushed this beer through Strange Brew Coffeehouse House Blend beans to have a coffee porter at the event. It turned out pretty good for such a quick turnaround beer. Would I normally do this? No, not really, but I’ve had a lot going on lately at the house (ahem, bathroom reno). This is why I went back to the cooler mash tun instead of my direct fired mash tun. I have everything stored away right now. The direct fired isn’t very portable right now, which this is something I need to change.

2016-07-30 07.36.03But why did I brew 8 gallons? Well, before I started my boil, I pulled off some wort. A friend wanted to make pastrami and wanted to braise it in beer. I suggested braising it in sweet unhopped wort. I suggested this when braising the meat you wouldn’t make the wort more bitter while letting it break down the fats. I thought this was a really cool idea. The final product was really good and interesting. I think beer wort has some potential to do some really creative things in the kitchen.

 

Recipe Details

Batch Size Boil Time IBU SRM Est. OG Est. FG ABV
8 gal 60 min 28.1 IBUs 37.0 SRM 1.063 1.014 6.6 %
Actuals 1.063 1.01 7.0 %

Style Details

Name Cat. OG Range FG Range IBU SRM Carb ABV
American Porter 20 A 1.05 - 1.07 1.012 - 1.018 25 - 50 22 - 40 2.3 - 2.9 4.8 - 6.5 %

Fermentables

Name Amount %
Pale Malt, Maris Otter 13 lbs 67.1
Munich Malt 2 lbs 10.32
Caramel/Crystal Malt - 40L 1.25 lbs 6.45
Black (Patent) Malt 10 oz 3.23
Cara-Pils/Dextrine 10 oz 3.23
Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L 10 oz 3.23
Chocolate Malt 10 oz 3.23
Pale Chocolate 10 oz 3.23

Hops

Name Amount Time Use Form Alpha %
Goldings, East Kent 2 oz 60 min Boil Pellet 5
Willamette 1 oz 15 min Boil Pellet 4.8
Goldings, East Kent 0.5 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 5
Willamette 0.5 oz 0 min Boil Pellet 4.8

Yeast

Name Lab Attenuation Temperature
Safale American (US-05) DCL/Fermentis 77% 59°F - 75°F

Mash

Step Temperature Time
Mash In 152°F 60 min

Right when I left Michael Tonsmiere’s talk on Hoppy Sour Beers at HomebrewCon I knew a hoppy sour was going to be on my to brew list in the near future. Well, here goes nothing. I based my recipe off of his that he shared with us at his talk. I brewed 11 gallons of wort and split the batches, 6 gallons in one carboy, 5 in another. The 6 gallons will become the Hoppy Sour Beer and the 5 gallons will be a Gose (by request of the wife).

Carboys sitting in my hot storeroom

Carboys sitting in my hot storeroom

85% 2 Row
15% Flaked Wheat

Mashed at 152

Boiled for 60 minutes, cooled to approximately 105 degrees, racked to each carboy.

Both carboys were soured for approximately 24 hours. My pH meter was a cheap one and it read 3.5 or so. Hey it tasted tart enough for my taste, I continued on. I’ll need to purchase a meter that I can rely on. This one is not very reliable at all.

Hoppy Sour (6 gallon carboy)

Soured with Omega Lacto Blend
I racked the 6 gallon carboy back into kettle, brought to 180, whirlpooled hops for 15 minutes with the following hops.

  • 1 oz Citra
  • 1 oz Simcoe
  • 1 oz Mosaic

Omega Lacto Blend, yes I saved this cake, will sour with it again.

WLP644 Sacc Brux Trois for “primary fermentation.”

Dry hopped for 7 days with the same amount of hops as above.

Before I dry hopped the beer, I tasted them and the beer was just a touch bitter with a quenching tartness. The hop flavor was good, but not as quite as quenching as the sample I tasted at HomebrewCon. After I dry hopped the beers I got an overwhelming bitterness and the sourness clashed together. Very interesting that I got some bitterness from the dry hopping. I believe I am going to try to blend some of the Gose into this beer to see if it will round out that bitterness. I’m pretty upset with that, but hey you learn from these mistakes. I love the hop flavor and aroma though. Next time I will bring the wort up to 180 and start the whirlpool, once the beer is well below 180 from the whirlpooling I’ll add my hops so I don’t extract as much bitterness from the hops. I will also only dry hop with a half an ounce of the hops this time. I believe 3 ounces for this was a bit much. I’m not sure what I was thinking.

I carbonated this beer with my new Blichmann QuickCarb. I’m going to write a review on it soon. I served this beer at a local food event. I believe calling this a Hoppy Sour turned people off and it they really weren’t interested in it. That’s ok thought because it is not
my best.

Gose (5 gallon carboy)

Soured with 2 Mango Good Belly Plus Shots

Racked this beer back to a kettle and brought it up to 180, I then added 15 grams of kosher salt and 10 grams of ground coriander. Before anyone gets onto me about not using whole, I know, I know. None of my grocery stores in town have whole coriander (ooof, I forgot to check the Asian Market, I will check there). That is the reason I backed off the coriander some because I knew the ground would be overwhelming. When grinding whole coriander in a mortar and pestle, it is meant to go into a beer.

I used US05 for “primary fermentation.”

This beer is in my kegerator with 12 PSI attached to it and I’m waiting patiently for this one to carb. I didn’t need this one for an even like I had the hoppy sour beer slated for.